THE FUR TRADE

Following intense pressure from animal rights protests and direct action, fur farming was banned in the UK in 2000.

Unfortunately however the sale of fur continues. Some people still see the skin of a murdered animal as a status symbol, and so sell and wear it openly. In other cases it is hidden in products such as coat trims, gloves, and even toys and ornaments.

Either way, there is nothing glamorous about anal electrocution, or skinning animals for their fur.

“There is no kind way to rip the skin off animals’ backs.”

– Natalie Imbruglia

The majority of animals killed for fur are kept in tiny, filthy cages on fur farms. Animals such as mink, foxes, cats and dogs, which would naturally roam for miles, are confined to tiny metal boxes. Fighting, cannibalism, and self-mutilation are common, as they are slowly driven to insanity by their captivity. To avoid getting blood on the fur, they are generally killed via vaginal or anal electrocution, gassing, or poisoning.

The animals who avoid fur farms are trapped in the wild. Often they are caught for days in snares which slowly bite deeper and deeper into the flesh and bone. Unable to move, they suffer from blood loss, dehydration, frostbite, gangrene, and are helpless to defend themselves against attacks by predators. In many cases, mothers will chew off their own limbs in order to get back to their babies. To preserve the fur, trapped animals are often stamped or beaten to death.

In order to prevent fur from rotting, a cocktail of chemicals are used to preserve it. As a result it is one of the worst industries in the world for toxic metal pollution, and causes a lot of damage to environment.

Due to the intensity of fur farming, and the filthy conditions that the animals are raised in, they are a hotbed of disease and infection. Several serious zoonotic diseases—which have the potential of spreading to humans—have originated on fur farms, including strains of Covid-19.

WHAT CAN I DO?

If you see fur on sale anywhere, we would encourage you to politely speak to the shop owner, and discuss the issues with them.

If they refuse to stop selling it, you could arrange a protest. Check out our tips for some ideas, and use our printable resources to spread the message.

PRINTABLE RESOURCES:

BOYCOTT FUR POSTER

This poster comes in both A4 (standard UK printer paper) and A3 (twice the size of A4).

DOWNLOADS:

 

A4
A3

THIS PRODUCT IS FUR STICKERS

These stickers are designed to be printed onto AVERY L7160 sheets (21 stickers per sheet), which can be widely purchased.

Download the template using the link below, and print them off at home.

Please make sure you ask permission before applying these stickers to any item that is not yours.

BOYCOTT FUR STICKERS

These stickers are designed to be printed onto AVERY J8166 sheets (6 stickers per sheet), which can be widely purchased.

Download the template using the link below, and print them off at home.

Please make sure you ask permission before applying these stickers to any item that is not yours.